LPN Training Programs Overview

LPN programs are offered by state approved training centers, which include: high schools, technical schools, vocational schools, community colleges, junior colleges, and hospitals. Most LPN programs require you to attend classroom studies and additional clinical practices under supervision. After completing your LPN training, you have to take the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX-PN) in order to receive your license and work as an LPN.

LPN programs take at least 9 months and 18 months at most, depending on the program you join.

LPN Education Requirements

To become an LPN, you need to be more than 18 years old and attend a 9 months long training program or more. And to be eligible for LPN training programs, you need to have at least a high school diploma or equivalent (GED). When you enroll for an LPN program, the college will ask you to take a basic academic skill test. This is what is commonly refereed to as LPN entrance exam. For more information regarding the specifics of each program you want to join, please check the LPN college website or give them a call directly, as each college may have its own specific requirements.

LPN Programs Curriculum

LPN training curricula vary from one program to the next, but most programs’ curricula consist of the following:

  • Fundamentals of Nursing
  • Anatomy/Physiology
  • Contemporary Health Issues Vocational Adjustment
  • Nutrition and Diet Therapy
  • Growth and Development
  • Intro to Pharmacology
  • Psychiatric Nursing
  • Medical-Surgical Nursing
  • Maternal Child Health

In addition to the above curriculum, LPN training courses may cover the following subjects, as well: biology, chemistry, first aid, physical education, and emergency medical technology. LPN students are also required to go through clinical practice in patient care under supervision.

LPN Career Overview

Over the years, the demand for licensed practical nurses (LPNs) has been increasing to the point where it’s now becoming easier to get a job as an LPN in various health care centers than other professionals in the same industry. The data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics indicates that the total number of LPNs and LVNs in 2008, across the nation, was over 750,000 and this number will keep on increasing by 21% in the coming 10 years. You can say the LPN career opportunity is financially rewarding. Again, according to BLS, in 2008, the national average LPN salary was $39,030. LPN salary greatly varies by state. You can find a list of LPN salary ranges by state here on our website.

Overall, the LPN jobs outlook is very good and it will be the same in the coming years. The nature of the job mostly involves providing basic care for patients and helping patients whenever they require assistance in their daily basic needs. As an LPN, you may work in nursing care facilities, home health care services, general medical and surgical hospitals, or offices of physicians. The salary you earn also varies according to the nature of your job and the work environment.

The best thing about this field is that there is always room to expand your career by taking additional training courses. For instance, you can become a registered nurse through LPN to RN program; you can also become a psychiatric technician or occupational therapist assistant.

LPN Job Description and Duties

If you are a caring, compassionate person with good communication skills, this career path will fit you just right. You will be working alongside medical doctors and registered nurses. You will monitor the patient’s conditions more closely than registered nurses and physicians and report your observation to them. You may also have nurse aids working under you and reporting to you. In addition to patient care, you may also be required to do the following tasks: collect patient’s health history, collect samples for laboratory testing, perform simple laboratory tests, and measure and record patients’ vital signs such as height, weight, temperature, blood pressure, pulse, and respiration. You may also be required to prepare and give injections and enemas, monitor catheters, dress wounds, and give alcohol rubs and massages. You may also clean and monitor medical equipment.

If you are convinced that this rewarding career field is in your future, you can find a list of LPN programs from every sate here in our website. You can choose from many LPN schools we have listed under their respective state and get more information directly from them. These schools provide state approved LPN programs. We only list state approved programs and we keep the directory as fresh as possible by updating it at least every 3 months.

 

Last Modified: 16 Apr 2012